Welcome

Hi, my name is Alys Jackson and I'm a poet and writer

based in Adelaide, South Australia.

My work has been published in magazines,

anthologies and online.

A Single Breath, Harold Goodwin Short Story Award, 2017

A Single Breath received the Harold Goodwin Short Story Award at the 2017 Henry Lawson Festival of Arts and was published in the Festival Anthology, 2017. The Anthology can be purchased from the Henry Lawson Festival of Arts website here.

The story of Eleanor in the ice and cold of Siberia is as controlled as her breathing. All her senses are engaged. A rider approaches: “a jangle of metal, the sigh of wood sliding over snow, a tinkling of bells, animals out of breath and a hoarse human cry”. The tension of the events is understated but very real, the metaphors confronting and layered.’ Dr Jane Downing, Charles Sturt University.

 

The Utter Absence of Everything, due for publication in Jellyfish Review, April 2018

Jellyfish review is an online journal committed to publishing new flash fiction.

Chiyogami Fires, Highly Commended in the Henry Lawson Society Short Story Award, 2017

Chiyogami Fires, has received Highly Commended in the Henry Lawson Literary Society Awards, Aug 2017. This is a story that feels very close to home due to the constant threat of bushfire during the summer months.

“Bushfires are creeping along the valley below Rossdale, burning out the gullies, blackening the grass, one tussock at a time, gaining speed on the uphill slope in a greedy push for the ridge.”

The Light Beneath her Door, shortlisted for the Alan Marshall Short Story Award, 2017

The Light Beneath Her Door, shortlisted for the 2017 Alan Marshall Short Story Award. The Alan Marshall Short Story Award (AMSSA), was founded in 1985 and is presented by the Nillumbik Shire Council. Alan Marshall was born in 1902 and is one of Australia’s most well-known writers. His trilogy, I can Jump Puddles, This is the Grass and In Mine Own Heart is the story of his childhood and struggle with disease. The Alan Marshall Short Story competition is only one of many great competitions for writers.

“‘You are like the wild roses that grow in my garden,’ she’d said once. ‘I can see your beauty. I can even smell your allure, but get too close and …’

She’d mimed pricking her finger on a thorn and laughed at the expression on his face.

‘You have too many expressions,’ she’d said.

What she meant, or what he thought she meant, was that he had too few words.”

Hollow Bones, shortlisted for the 2017 Big Issue Fiction Edition, 2017

Hollow Bones, shortlisted for the Big Issue Fiction Edition, June 2017.

“Jen rests her weight into the wall. There are too many people crammed into the streets around her, boxes and crates exploding their contents across the hard-packed earth, life hanging in colourful swatches and a bare-foot transience.”

The CWA’s Trip to Peru, shortlisted for the Alan Marshall Short Story Award, 2016

In 2016 my short story, The CWA’s Trip to Peru, was shortlisted in the Alan Marshall Short Story Award. This was a story written from personal experience after working as a volunteer guide inside the Amazon Rainforest, Peru – that melded with an article I read on the Country Women’s Association and the amazing work they do.

“A canoe load of determined, middle-aged women with assorted baggage – not all of it tangible – aren’t the easiest of companions nor the most patient, but add to that one hundred percent humidity, and a shortage of loos and well, let’s just say it’s touch and go.”

Drought, received the Grenfell Henry Lawson Award for Prose, 2017

In 2017, my poem, Drought, received the Henry Lawson Festival of Arts Poetry Award and has been published in the Anthology, 2017.

This poem has both the grandeur and delicacy of an almost neoclassical, Augustan elegance – the verse is regular, well-paced and its perspective is both judicious and minutely insightful. It escapes both Romantic affect and ballad simplification. It’s a poem that “thinks” more than “feels”. This is wise, meditative, compelling poetry.’ David Gilbey, President of Booranga Writer’s Centre and author of Pachinko sunset (Island Press, 2016).

To Drift in Sandstone Folds, Highly Commended in the Margaret Reid Poetry Contest, 2009

My poem, To Drift in Sandstone Folds, won highly commended in the Margaret Reid Poetry Contest. There are more of my poems on the Poetry pages of my website.

Children’s Fiction

Momo and Hanapublished in the Feb 2017 edition of the School Magazine, the world’s oldest literary magazine for children.

Water for Everyone was published in Orbit, August 2017.

Isaac and the Australian, Published in Orbit, December 2017.

Nine more stories are due for publication.